Tag Archives: World happiness report 2017

The 3rd Happiest Place in the world?

30 Mar

Iceland seems to be the place to go for a short break these days. No one ever talks about taking a two-week holiday or a month off to see Iceland. A couple of things probably play into this. One is that it seems to be really expensive. So expensive that only the Norwegians and the Danish and any of the residents of Monaco could afford to go and you know the Monegasque. people have no plan on heading north on holiday. The second is probably the weather. I’m feeling cold just thinking about the place.

Iceland is also a pretty unforgiving landscape. Icelandic natives call it the Beast, It gets tepid rather than warm during the summer months, tepid and bright and then it gets cold and dark really dark.  Many people think there are no trees in Iceland. That’s a myth but the truth is they don’t have as many as the Vikings would have seen in the 9th century on arrival or the Irish monks that visited in the 7th and the 8th century. What must Iceland have looked like to these early arrivals on this volcanic rock. The First Norwegian arrivals called it Snowland. A large amount of Iceland is volcanic rock. Not ideal terrain for tree planting. But reforestation is happening. Most trees are based around towns and Reykjavik

Alcohol was only legalised in 1989. With less than 30 years of legal alcohol production they wouldn’t be seen as world leaders in brewing or distilling. In 1908 Icelanders voted on a ban on all alcohol this came into play in 1915. By 1921 Spain refused to buy any Icelandic fish stocks until Iceland began to buy Spanish wine. Spirits were legalised in 1935 and beer with more 2.25% alcohol was not allowed, with the temperance lobby arguing it would lead to greater depravity( said the descendants of the Vikings)

As Icelandic citizens travelled abroad regularly the began two get a taste for beer. Bars in Iceland began adding spirits to non alcoholic beer for customers in the 1980’s but the minister for Justice banned this practice. Coming in line with other western societies prohibition of beer ended on March 1st 1989. Which ingeniously is now called “Beer Day”or Bjordagur.

Again you need to be quite organised if you like to drink alcohol in Iceland, as all Vínbúðin ( Wine shops) are state owned and are few and far between. They have restrictive opening hours 11am until 6pm Monday to Saturday . They go mad on Friday and stay open untill 7pm. On Sunday you can forget it none are open that day.

So when Icelanders are not drinking they read books. They really love books . In Iceland they publish more books per capita than any other country. Apparently 1 in 10 will publish a book over a lifetime.  As they say, “ Better to go Barefoot than without books” Maybe this ability to get lost in reading and writing allows the Icelandic to immerse themselves in imagination  and learning during the dark winter days and nights.

The Icelandic have a day for lots of different reasons. A day for men Bundadagur, a day for women called Konudagur and a day all countries should celebrate… a day for buns Bolludagur.

Buns

If you like McDonald’s you are out of luck They closed down when the Krona became expensive to deal with internationally and all the McDonald’s produce had to be imported from Germany. Not a bad thing in my opinion.

The truth is that when you are living or travelling within Iceland. You seem to have a disconnection and a connection. You have a connection to beauty and vastness of this beautiful Island. You can find solitude and a connection with nature that other places on earth make it feel a little more difficult to do and you also make a connection with people, you also can readily disengage from what really doesn’t matter in life and create a greater bond with the environment around you, the people from it and ultimately a greater connection with yourself.

Icelandic land

What are the 6 key factors to happiness and how does Iceland score rate with them?

  1. GDP per capita
  2. Social Support
  3. Healthy Life expectancy
  4. Social Freedom
  5. Generosity
  6. Absence of corruption

Icelands GDP per capita

When you think about it the GDP of Iceland should have fallen dramatically since the financial banking collapse of 2008. The Nordic average between Norway, Denmark,Sweden,Finland and Iceland is $47,375. Iceland’s GDP in 2016 sits at $43,872  this is higher than Finland but below the other 3 Nordic countries. But we know GDP on its own does not create a happier nation.

But economics does play a part and for a while Iceland was teetering on a rocky edge. The financial collapse in 2008 brought tough decisions for the people of Iceland. Three Banks  Kaupping,Glitnir and Landsbanki  were the banks responsible. The banks were equivalent to 10 times the GDP of Iceland and 20 times the state budget. Too big to bail out. In the space of 3 days 97% of the banking sector collapsed.

Iceland responded by conducting an extremely detailed investigation through a special agency into how this came about . They discovered like many other countries that the loans and capital were built on a distorted web of transactions and deals.

From this the Govt decided that people could not be driven into bankruptcy and the debt of households could not be more than the cost of their house. It became more complicated than this. The British and the Netherlands Government wanted a return of $5 billion that their citizens had lost  from Icesave accounts s during this collapse, The two governments had paid out to the citizens from those countries that had lost out. They then looked to Iceland for a reimbursement. The Icelandic Govt was going to reimburse but the president Olafur Ragnar Grimsonn vetoed this twice and went to a democratic vote of the people and the decision to pay back Britain and the Netherlands was vetoed,

Gordon Browns Government were incensed and placed Iceland on a listing of terrorists countries and organisations that included Al Qaeda and the Taliban. But the president Olafur said afterwards. “Paying back the British economy was asking Icelandic taxpayers to be responsible for the failure of this private bank. It was equal to asking the British Taxpayer to be responsible for $1,125 billion for a failure of a British Bank in Spain or Italy.” We did not pump public money into failed banks. We treated them like private companies that went bankrupt and let them fail”

Investigations happened and CEOs of Banks and others were jailed. No one else had done this before. GDP has dropped over the past number of years but all the mathematicians , engineers and computer scientists that were involved in the banks quickly got jobs in the I.T, Science  and start up sector, a much more beneficial use of talent for Iceland in the long run.

Dora Guorun Guomundsdottiris a psychologist in Reykjavik and the director general of the public health services Iceland. claims that money only 1 to 4% of happiness in Iceland. She says that people often overestimate the importance of money and their happiness.

We must also remember that Greece, Italy and Spain are still struggling years on and are much lower down the world happiness rankings with Greece at 87. Ireland is doing better at number 15 on rankings but it has accumulated a lot of debt for future generations.

Social Support

This is one of the key advantages of living in small communities, Thee is a greater chance of feeling that you have the support of people around you.

The question asked in the World happiness report was “If you were in trouble, do you have relatives or friends you can count on to help you whenever you need them?” Iceland scored higher than any other nation on this front with 99% of its populace agreeing with this statement. The one key thing that Icelanders feel is that there is always someone there to look out for them. Even as outlined above times of economic crises the Government and especially the President looked out for them and acted in a manner that cared more than other governments had done in similar circumstances. Those in power supported them in hard times.

Within Icelandic life Children have always mattered. Parents are provided with 9 months Maternity/Paternity leave for children. Both parents get joint custody of children after a divorce unless otherwise agreed. The child will always take the father’s name but since 1991 equality has allowed the mothers name to be used to. It works like this your father’s name could have been  Olarfur Arnarson his son’s name is Benny he becomes Benny Olarfsun ( son of Olarf) rather than Benny Arnarson. A daughter’s name might be Eva she will be called Eva Olarfdóttir( daughter of Olarfur) you get it now.

Incredibly 70.5% of babies are born out-of-wedlock in Iceland. There is no stigma with this in society and at the father is generally a part of the child’s life always. This goes back to Viking times when the men went travelling to foreign lands to pillage and get warmer, they left their wives at home with slaves from Scotland or Ireland. Many wives ended up having babies with the men left behind , When the Vikings returned their was a great tolerance for what happened and today it’s not uncommon for all 3 parents to be were involved in parenting. To this day if a parent that has sole custody marries again the Stepfather or Stepmom also gets custody even after one whole year of cohabitation.

Universities run day care for babies so Mothers can continue their education. This is very normal. Maternity leave is for 9 months at 80% salary. Thus is divided into 3 months for the Mother, 3 Months for the Father and 3 to be shared by both.  State run play schools are then there to help once the parents return to work, Iceland like all the other Nordic countries a high level of social support that contributes to its peoples happiness.

 

Healthy Life Expectancy

iceland thermal

The Icelandic population is one of the worlds highest Life expectancy rates at 83. The world average is 71. The fresh air, clean water, time spent sitting in thermal pools and an oily fish diet must play a big part in this. In the World Happiness report 2017 ( which rates this score on a number of factors) this is where Iceland excels with a score of 72.05 when the Nordic average is 71.42 and with the United states pitching in at only 70.13 . It’s hard to beat the Icelandic on life expectancy.

Generosity

They are also a very generous nation and happily give to others. They score higher than any other Nordic country the donation scale. Scoring 0.27 on the index as opposed to The Nordic average of 0.12. In 2015 Over 12,000 of the 329,000 Iceland population asked the Government to provide more support to Syrian refugees. Many offering ways that they can help.

Social freedom

Iceland 1

On March the 8th 2017 World women day Iceland announced it will require all employers to prove that they provide equal pay to their employees, regardless of gender, ethnicity, sexuality or nationality. Iceland is the first country in the world to introduce such a policy.

When Icelanders were asked “Are you satisfied or dissatisfied with your freedom to choose what to do with your life?  95% of the population were able to respond positively to this in line with Norway, Denmark and Finland.

Choices in Iceland are easier if you know that you have a large number of supports available to you. Education is free and University education has no tuition fees just a simple €100/€250 registration fee so students are not crippled with debt on leaving College.

For single parents with children there are day care facilities available within the University to cater for child minding. The ability to make independent decisions about careers and life choices is driving factor in happiness levels. Icelanders have a huge feeling of autonomy and control over their lives.

With 24 days annual holidays provided and 12 paid public holidays, Iceland has plenty of time to enjoy time with the family,travel or enjoy leisure time.

Just like other Nordic countries babies are left in prams outside coffee shops and children are allowed to travel to school on their own as young as six. Playing outside even on dark evenings and long summer nights is a way of life for citizens, with many social freedoms that others do not.

Interestingly Iceland’s government-run television station, which began broadcasting in 1966 and was the country’s sole channel for 20 years, went dark every Thursday until 1987 in order to promote human interaction. It also did not broadcast during the vacation month of July until 1983. People in Iceland love playing boardgames. Maybe thisd began in that period. Scrabble, anyone?

 Corruption

According to the Global peace index. Iceland is the safest place in the world to live a position it has held since 2009 with the exception of 2010 when it slipped to number 2. Knowing your country has that title must create a nice feeling for residents of Iceland. They don’t have an army or a navy yet they were one of the founding members of NATO.

On the Corruption perception index 2016 Iceland scored the lowest score of all the Nordic countries dropping to 14th place. This is not the worst position to be,but it is an indicator that perception from citizens  is different from once perceived. In the world happiness report 2017 Iceland scored a 0.72 perception of living in a corrupt society much higher than the Danish score of 0.21 and a Swedish and Norwegian score of 0.25.

The banking crisis and trust in organisations that plan to place factories where they can mine silica for Solar panels are seen as at odds with how Icelanders see how their country should move forward. There is also talk about privatisation off the health service which is worrying many that health care may drop into the wrong hands.

Strong Mental Health

Icelandic road

Dora Guorun Guomundsdottiris reckons that if monetary income only predicts 4% of happiness where does the other 96% needed come from. According to research that she has completed and from other studies, the best predictor for happiness is, social relationships. Findings from Icelandic data demonstrates that living with a partner is more likely to result in living a happier life than living alone, and spending time with friends and family also increases happiness. Another important factor for happiness is health, and in particular a persons mental health.

Dora developed Ten commandments of Mental health to help with people’s misconceptions of what leads to happiness. The Public health Institute of Iceland sent the ten commandments on a fridge magnet as a Christmas gift to every Icelandic home. If you drop into any Icelandic home have a look on the fridge and you may see them sitting there. Here they are

  • Think Positively
  • Cherish the ones you love
  • Continue learning as you live
  • Learn from your mistakes
  • Exercise daily
  • Do not complicate your life unnecessarily
  • Try to understand and encourage those around you
  • Do not give up: Success in life is a marathon not a sprint.
  • Discover and nurture your talents
  • Set goals for yourself and pursue your dreams

What is working?

For people to have lived on a cold  volcanic rocky outcrop in the Northern Atlantic for over a 1,000 years, it takes a number of strengths and one of those strengths is resilience. Whatever about living in Iceland in 2017. It is hard to image what it was like in the 9th and subsequent centuries. A country completely exposed to the elements. Yet they grew oats, barley and wheat, and ground the grain to make flour, porridge and ale. Vikings grew vegetables such as onions, beans and cabbages. Their farm animals included pigs, sheep, goats, cattle, geese and chickens. They used manure from the animals to keep the soil fertile. The surrounding oceans were the farms for Fisherman. But through all this the bitter cold of living in unheated abodes unlike now must have been difficult. Surrounded by unforgiving seas.

On 11 march 1984 Guðlaugur Friðþórsson was On a fishing trawler which capsized off the Westmanns Islands 3 miles from Iceland’s coast. The 4 other fisherman onboard died as the ship sank. Guðlaugur swam the 3 miles in 5º sea temperature to the Icelandic coast before having to traverse volcanic rock and -3 º wind temperatures to arrive at house 9 hours after capsizing at 7am. His core body temperature had only dropped to 34º without signs of Hypothermia. A film called the deep was made about his story. This is an example of the resilience that is needed to live on a rocky outcrop in the North atlantic.

The Icelanders also understand the importance of social  connection and surrounding yourself with family and friends. OF all the countries in the World happiness report 2017, Iceland scored highest when asked “If you were in trouble, do you have relatives or friends you can count on to help you whenever you need them?.  A huge 99% of icelanders said yes to this. They understand the importance of having social connections.

Equality is also something that they have worked on providing equality to all nationalities , genders and sexualities on March The 8th of 2017. Inequality within cultures is one of the greatest contributors to happiness.

The financial collapse of 2008 happened over 3 days that should have signalled an end to Iceland’s fortunes. They are still struggling to this day and the president and the people of the country that the public money should not be used to fund private banks. Measures were taken and some bankers were jailed none of the same actions are taken by Ireland, Greece Spain or Portugal all countries that could have learned from Icelands human approach. The people of Iceland feel they have a say and for many (but not all) they feel that the Government cares about them.

Iceland’s biggest problem at present is the huge rise in the number of visitors. It was roughly 500,000 a year before the iconic collapse of 2008 and is now closer to 1.5 million a year. Can Iceland sustain this number of tourists and does it have the  infrastructure to cope with an increasing number of them. Does Iceland want its main industry to be tourism or has it a more sustainable goal for industry as tourism can be fickle and as the ash cloud eruption of 2010 showed it can suddenly stop.

They have realised that if others are miserable, the likelihood will be that everyone will struggle with Happiness. The financial crisis is seen as a chance to wipe the slate clean and use it as an opportunity to build a more open society. In Iceland 85% of people reported  more positive experiences( feelings of rest, pride, accomplishment and enjoyment) than negative experiences of pain, boredom and sadness. This says a lot about the 3rd happiest nation in the world.

Sunny Iceland

Either way the Sunny outlook of a people who have found a way to live happily on a sometime dark, unforgiving rocky outcrop in the North Atlantic is a testament to the realisation that it is your outlook on life and how you live it that matters not your surroundings alone. Icelanders have learnt to embrace where they live and love who they live with.

They have a lovely saying that sums it all up, sometimes life can unexpectedly surprise you with little gifts

Það er rúsínan í pylsuendanum (That is the raisin at the end of the hot dog) 

 

 

Advertisements

Is Norway Really Happy?

28 Mar

When you think about it Norway doesn’t really have much going for it. It’s Geographical  position is one of the coldest parts of Europe. Long cold winters are a part of life in a country that has 30% of its landmass in the Arctic circle. Temperatures drop significantly, snow arrives lack of light and darkness is pretty much a way of life from November to February. So much so they call it Mørketiden ( murky times) in the far northern regions. The long days of sunlight from June to August must play havoc with the Nordic Circadian rhythm.

Norway was extremely poor before the late 1960’s and the they discovered oil. Until then Norwegian life was nothing like it is today’

The high rate of taxes between 40/45% of Salary and a vat rate of 25% on goods and 15% tax on food take quite a chunk out of everyone’s earnings. A Tv licence is 2680 KR which is €317. So you would expect some quality TV for that price.More about that later.

They don’t spend too much time at cinemas or in restaurants due to the high cost. They haven’t got the same love affair with coffee as the Finns and the Swedes both number 1 and 2 in the world coffee drinking rankings. They don’t even like ice cream as much as the ice cream obsessed Swedes or enjoy Fika( drinking coffee with a sweet treat) as Swedes do daily and at 3pm in almost all workplaces .

You need to be quite organised to buy alcohol, as only alcohol below 4.75% abs can be sold in supermarkets, anything stronger must be sold in state-run shops Vinmonopolet.They close by 18:00 on weekdays and 15:00 on a Saturday and no alcohol sales on Sunday. So If you like a drink in Norway you need to plan ahead. Even queuing up to purchase your alcohol is no guarantee you will get it as if it says 18:00 hrs on the till by the time you get to the counter you can forget about your party tonight. The till shuts down sales.

They have a criminal Eurovision song contest record finishing last 11 times. This overshadows the 3 wins they have to date. But creates a record in itself as no other country has had so many “Nul” points as Norway.

I have never been to a party yet where someone has said  “if only we had a few more Norwegians here then the party would really get going” So they don’t have a reputation of being the most sociable people. If they do it’s a well-kept secret.

Prices of coffee, beer and eating out are also seen as quite high in comparison to the rest of Europe and backpackers are told that you would need about €90 a day to get by, seems expensive. People complain about the lack of choice of food especially those that have moved from cultures with more options in a supermarket and sometimes the quality of fruit and veg in some stores seems questionable.

But for some reason

Despite all that I have outlined above, the people of Norway are constantly placed in the top ten happiest countries in the world. In 2017 they stole the top spot from the happy Danish people and beat their closest neighbours Sweden, Iceland and Finland to the top spot.

A Brief history?

Norway is an interesting country. Norway was relatively poor once one of the poorest countries in Europe in the early part of the 20th century. It had spent centuries with an on and off connection to Sweden starting in the 14th century.  and ultimately gaining independence from Sweden on the 7th of June 1905 only to have the 33-year-old  Prince Carl of Denmark called on to become the King of Norway. The National day for Norway is Constitution Day on May the 17th this goes back to 1814 its simply called “Syttende Mai” The Seventeenth of May. Norway and Denmark had sided with and Napoleon against the British and lost but it was the first time Norway had its own independent Constitution. For many years in the Early 19th century the Swedes had not allowed the Norwegians to celebrate this day. The will to celebrate “Syttende Mai” grew in significance. It also coincides with the end of the German occupation of Norway and the cessation of the World war 2 on the 8th of May 1945 which for many Norwegians was another great reason to celebrate Syttende Mai.

It was only with the discovery of oil and gas in the late 1960’s that turned Norway’s economic  fortunes around. It invested the oil revenues in a sovereign wealth fund that has a present day value of $885 billion and they also heavily taxed any foreign investors in Norwegian oil.

What are the 6 Key foundations to a nations Happiness and does Norway have them?

  1. GDP per capita
  2. Social Support
  3. Healthy life expectancy
  4. Social Freedom
  5. Generosity
  6. Absence of Corruption

Norway’s GDP per capita

Norway has an extremely healthy GDP at $64,124 . The nordic average for Finland Iceland,Sweden, Denmark and Norway combined is $47,375. in the 1980’s both Britain and  Norway invested in North sea oil reserves. Rather than splurge on all the money from oil that was discovered the Norwegians created a Sovereign wealth fund. Even with todays low oil prices, Norway is shielded from economic upset and citizens have guaranteed pensions on retirement and very little stress about their future. The fund is worth $885 billion and is the third largest sovereign wealth fund in the world. Britain never developed one and to this day has none.

The cost of living is expensive in Norway. The wages that are paid are commensurate with this and people can afford to get by with limited worries about financial difficulty.  Norway has the 2nd highest female to male ratio income. The normal stresses that the the rest of the world experience are not felt by Norwegians. Once they travel abroad there money goes even further. Frequent shopping trips to neighbouring  Sweden for alcohol and other items can bring savings. Even better is a trip to southern Europe or elsewhere where a Norwegian wallet will buy a bottle of Champagne while the rest of us are drinking Cava.

Social Support

Norway 6

One of the key things to feeling happy is the understanding that someone has your back. In home life or at the workplace “the knowing that there is someone to support you when things might get hard whether you need it or not” is a key component to a positive life evaluation and Norwegians have this. In Norway 93% of people believe that they have someone who they can rely on in times of need.

Norwegian Parents get to share 46 weeks of Maternity/Paternity leave for each child at 100% income if both parents share the leave and 56 weeks at 80% of income. Starting a job and thinking about having children are not a barrier to an employers decision to choose you. It is seen as something that everyone experiences and you may be asked the question at your interview process only to be informed of the great Maternity leave policy that the company have in place for you if you have Children.

Sick pay from work is 100% of salary and Unemployment assistance is 62% of last 3 years salary. Saying that the unemployment figures for Norway are 4%. Which means that many have purposeful employment.

Health care costs per capita are the highest in the world at $9,715. The benefits of high taxes provide all under 16’s and pregnant women with free medical care. Everyone else once they reach an annual deductible medical expense threshold of about €210 then receives free medical care. This takes a huge amount of stress out of the possibility of getting ill as many other countries have private health care systems for their citizens. If a hospital is unable to treat you condition in Norway it will arrange treatment abroad free of charge for you, That is hard to beat.

Education in Norway is free. University is 96% funded by public money. There are no tuition fees. The large student debts that many students end up with in Countries like Britain and the USA only contribute to an unhappy and stressful start to working life. The only debt that Norwegian students end up with from University is if they have needed to move city and rent elsewhere.

Health care on tap, free education for all, Maternity/Paternity leave with at least 80% of salary being paid for up to 56 weeks combined with a 100% sick pay scheme if illness arrives and a 62% of salary unemployment rate if you are unlucky enough to become a part of the 4% unemployed Norwegians.

They Have a healthy Life expectancy.

Eat enough Omega 3’s and this is bound to happen.Norway is surrounded and filled with a lot of water. They have quite a healthy lifestyle. Alcohol consumption is 28th out of all the 33 OECD countries. They also have a good health service and life expectancy of 82 compared with the OECD average of 80.

Also knowing that their future is secure with the $885 billion Sovereign wealth fund as a safety net for any future economic downturns. Norwegians experience less stress in their lives until the winter olympics and the Swedes beat them in Curling.

Almost 100% of the Norwegian population are satisfied with their drinking water. They live an outdoors life and like to Ski at any possible chance. The are surrounded by beautiful clean air and have 32.000 electric cars running on free electricity at present. Clean air in an oil rich country.

Social Freedom

Norway 4

Norwegians value their freedom. They only work 1,423 hours per year the 2nd lowest in the world. They spend 15.6 hours of their day on average concentrating on family,leisure and personal care. That makes sense.

Feriepenger is a word Norwegians have for a month of Holidays in July. Very little gets done in July. The sun is up the weather warmer and everyone gets paid for the month off with 12% of last years salary. Norway even has free bridging days if a public holiday falls on a Tuesday or a Thursday then you get the Monday or the Friday off to spend more time eating Fårikål a national dish of boiled mutton and peppercorns YUM!!!

When asked the question  in the world happiness report 2017  “Are you satisfied or dissatisfied with your freedom to choose what to do with your lives? the Norwegians responded with a resounding yes. Norwegians can choose to go to university and they can readily choose their careers.

Allemansrett: Means you have the right to roam pretty much anywhere in Norway. You can pitch your tent, travel and forage anywhere that is not private land. Norway is a vast country with a population of only 5 million people. There is a lot of land that is free for its citizens to explore and enjoy.

Do Norwegians feel safe.

Norway 5

Norway has quite a low  prison population. It has less than roughly 3,800 in a country with a population of 5 million. Rehabilitation is a big part of prison life. Prisons are open rather than closed and turning inmates into valued members of society is a priority. That makes Norway’s incarceration rate just 75 per 100,000 people, compared to 707 people for every 100,000 people in the US. Taking someones freedom is seen as punishment enough for crimes.

Leaving a purse behind in a coffee shop and returning to find it still where you left it is a common part of Norwegian life. Children are left in prams outside coffee shops as parents drink coffee. Children play outside on dark evenings in the winter and crime levels are very low. The murder rate is among the lowest in the world.

Norwegians take reformation of the individuals importantly. Three young children were playing in the snow one day  in 1994 in Trondheim ,two boys and a girl Silje Redergard. They were six and Silje was five. An argument broke out and Silje was killed by the boys. The boy names were never released and the papers never ran with the story like the Bulger case in Britain. They were immediately assigned into new Kindergartens with the approval of the parents of other children there. Rehabilitation was provided for the boys until they where 18 yrs old. One has responded well the other struggles to this day with what he has done but neither was incarcerated. Silje”s mother although still heartbroken agrees with the system of rehabilitation that Norwegian society has compared to other countries. Even Anders Behring Breivik has only received a 21 year sentence for the killing of 77 people in July 2011. His release will be postponed if authorities do not think he is fully rehabilitated.

Trust

Trust plays a big part in Norwegian society all wages and taxes paid are transparent for everyone to see online even the Prime ministers salary and tax returns,

The Government even employed a Philosopher to government role to advise on how best morally to spend the Sovereign Wealth fund. Henrik Syse advised the government on how spend the oil money that funded the wealth fund. His thinking was it took 200 million years for the oil to be formed let us not waste it in 50 years. The Norwegians use the surplus created from the fund but on Henrik’s advice they never touch the capital because it is not their money but future generations money for them to use. Quite a forward way of thinking that has kept Norway as one of the most stable countries in the world and allowed them to ride out the financial storm of 2008 and the falling oil prices of 2016/17.

They like the slow life

In 2009 the state broadcaster aired a live broadcast of the famous Oslo to Bergen railway journey, filmed from the perspective of the driver at the front of the train. Its a 500km  train journey live on TV and 25% of the Nation watched it probably eating boiled mutton while they did. This was recreated in 2011 in June with a coastal boat trip from Bergen to Kirkenes a 134 hour live broadcast of the boat trip. People came out to greet the ship as it passed and for 6 days the country was enthralled. It was the most watched broadcast in Norwegian Television history with over half the whole population of 5 million tuning in. The Queen even came out to get involved. There have been more slow TV broadcasts of a live crackling fire, salmon fishing, a knitting marathon and canal cruises. All mesmerisingly slow and relaxing and contributing to the calm approach to life that the Norwegians possess. Allowing them more time to write Eurovision hits.

What Norway is doing right.

Norway is a country which has so many of the attributes of a happy society.  People in Norway experience less anxiety about what is around the corner for them. They have an education system that is free and available to all to make choices career wise without incurring the burden of financial debt in the early years of working life. Many jobs in Norway are seen as job for life and are recruited with this in mind. Maternity and Paternity leave can be taken for over a year on between 80 to 100%  pay. Sick pay is 100% of Salary. July is a month of Holiday which is paid for by contributions paid in advance by workers. They have bridging holidays if a national holiday falls on a Tuesday of Thursday to give longer off. That’s smart

Unemployment is at 4% but if you become one of the 4% you are paid 62% of your previous salary until you get your next employment. The Health service is free after you have paid roughly €210 in charges for the year. Any operation that the hospital can not provide for you domestically is organised and paid for abroad.

You are unlikely to go to prison but if you do you will work on a programme of reahabilitation to return you as a functioning member of Norwegian society when you leave. Everyone in prison has a job and many cater for themselves,Trust is a major part of society and everyones wages and taxes are available to view online.

The Government has not squandeed the money made from the oil reserves discovered less than 50 years ago. They have delayed gratification and created a fund of $885 billion that will ensure that the country survives economic downturns and guarantees a pension on retirement to all Norwegian citizens.  With A health life expectancy of 82 years and a beuitiful clean environment to live in. You can see why Norwegians feel as happy about life as they do.

Maybe that happiness can help Norway forget all those nul point Eurovision losses and 11 last place positions.

 

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: