Archive | March, 2015

Does your company treat work like work!

25 Mar

What would happen if you decided to run your business with less rules and in the process changed the mindset of what your employees think work should be.,,,forever.

Listen to Ricardo Semler tell you why Life is far more important than work ever will be. Thinking different can provide surprising answers.

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What good has your company done for others today?

19 Mar
Think of others

Think of others

Is your company profitable? Have you proudly grown your company from a fledgling idea into a profitable organisation with Employees and maybe Shareholders all benefitting from it’s growth. Well done if you have.

Who or what has contributed to your success? Your drive and ambition? A loyal workforce? Investors and shareholders? A committed invisible group of poorly paid employees on the other side of the world, working in miserable conditions with long hours that would never be accepted in your developed country? A polluted river, landscape or townland that you will never see? Drinking water filled with toxins that contributed to the production of your product? A lost forest or landscape ravaged by mining or displacement to provide the minerals necessary for your products success? The indebted customer who has experienced foreclosure on a loan you provided knowing they would eventually default on?

If your companies success is attained through hurt caused to your fellow man and the destruction of the environment so many call home then maybe it’s time to rethink what you can do to create greater good on this Earth.

Once again the two questions you need to ask yourself each day

  1. What has my organisation done today to better your fellow man and this world?
  2. What has my organisation done today to hurt your fellow man and this world?

We are all just trying to put food on the table. How sweet and nourishing our food must taste knowing it has come from our contribution to the greater good of others, or is our mouth filled with a bitter taste knowing  it has been paid for by the pain of others.

I thought this Ted Talk from Simon Anholt summed up our need to create not just profitable companies or happy organisations but workplaces that contribute ( like Ireland and Finland) to becoming Good companies.

Who worked less hours the medieval peasant or the 21st century worker?

9 Mar

14th Century worker

Is the 40 hr working week a thing of the past? You would hope so.

Did you know that in the 14th century the average casual labourer worked 1440 hrs a year. OECD figures for 2013 show us that the average UK worker worked 1,669 hours last year with Greece putting in a whopping 2,037 and the Netherlands enjoying a 1380 hr working year. The USA worked 1,788 which possibly could be higher due to the large number of part-time work and multiple jobs held by Statesiders.

Working conditions may have been a lot different in the 14th century  and have been dictated by seasons and weather. Workers at that time also found many reasons to celebrate a high number of seasonal festivals and stop working when they had made enough money. There was no material goods on hand in shops that required excessive need for money.Working hours were shorter and life was celebrated.

Although by the time of the industrial revolution working hours had got out of hand when seasons, lighting and weather did not dictate the amount of work a man could do. By 1840 the average UK worker worked between 3105-3588 hours a year… Gulp!! But luckily for those aged 9-13 yrs old the 1833 Factory Act had limited their working day to a meagre 8 hrs and those aged 14-18 only had to work 12 hours of their day. The 19th century became the period when workers realised that there was more to life than toiling. The first murmurings that changes were on the way came at around the 1840’s. Samuel Duncan Parnell a carpenter by trade in New Zealand “There are twenty-four hours per day,eight of these should be of work,eight for sleep and the remaining eight for recreation and in which men to do what little things they want for themselves

It was really midway through the 20th century that the 8 hr working day became a realisation and law for many countries.With countries like France in 1936 through the Matignon agreements and the US in 1938 through the Fair labour standards Act, the 8 hour day became a changed way of working. Electricity, lighting with mechanical modernisation allowed greater efficiencies and less manual input.

John Maynard Keynes even spoke about the 15 hour working week becoming a possibility by 2030. With giant technological and computerised advancements and a world of automation you would have thought that the 15hr week would have become reality for many as we move through the 21st century. Allowing man to spend time educating himself, developing a greater personal wellbeing and creating communities that benefit everyone. But the rise of consumerism was something that Keynes never foresaw.  Governments unease at having a large number of their population with time to think and possibly… revolt is probably a factor too. To be honest we have not developed societies that know how to cater for mass free time or know how to fund it. With the eventual introduction of Universal basic income we might see a change to this.

In the Netherlands were the average working week is 29 hours and a World Happiness ranking of 4th place it looks like there are benefits to working shorter hours. With 15 years to go until we hit 2030 it looks unlikely that we will hit the 15 hour working week, unless you count the arrival of zero hours contracts which have no benefit to the employee.

My belief that shorter more efficient working weeks benefit everyone. I have written about it on numerous occasions. We should grasp technology and automation and start to develop communities and societies that integrate wellbeing with work. With more emphasise on wellbeing than work.The idea that man is incomplete unless he has employment is a fallacy. We just haven’t thought hard enough about the possibilities we could replace work with. The Medieval worker would have gladly grasped the development of Steam power and machine tools that drove the Industrial revolution but would have baulked at the idea of handing over all their free time and a 150 day working year. A working year that in 2015 many of us would still envy.

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